BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

  • Mayor Bert Adams
  • District #1 Tom Kapper, Commissioner
  • District #2 John Branch, Commissioner
  • District #3 MaryBeth Henderson, Commissioner
  • District #4 Lee Holmes, Vice Mayor

FROM THE MAYOR: Bert Adams

Upcoming Events

November 18th – 19th will be the town wide garage sale. No need to call and sign up, just put your stuff out and start selling.

December is a very busy month, starting with the Tree Lighting complete with snow and hot coco on December 4th at Del Bello Park, from 5:00pm – 7:00pm.

December 8th is the Holiday Home Decorating Contest. Turn your lights on at dusk. If you want to ensure your home is viewed, please contact town hall to sign up.

Christmas Boat Parade will be held December 11th.

Our Annual Santa Parade will be Saturday December 17th. The parade will start around at 2:30pm at the south end of town.

SANITARY SEWER SYSTEM

The town has been very pro-active in dealing with the recent sanitary issues around the state/county. Seminole Septic, Inc. was hired by the town a couple months ago to perform televised inspections of the town’s sanitation system and to pressure clean the lines.

Inflow and infiltration are the technical terms referring to rainwater and/or groundwater that enter the sewer system through such sources as cracked pipes, leaky manholes, or improperly connected storm drains, and roof gutter downspouts. Most inflow comes from rainwater and most infiltration comes from groundwater. The Town’s system is designed to handle only sanitary sewage and not storm water runoff. To prevent excess water from being sent to the sewer system and your money going down the drain, please practice the following:

Do

  • Inspect the rain gutters on your house to see if the downspout connects to a sewer line. If the gutter downspouts are connected to the sewer line, have them disconnected. The rainwater needs to be directed onto your lawn
  • Locate and check your sewer cleanout. The cleanout is usually a small pipe, about 4-inches in diameter, outside your house. Replace missing or damaged caps so that rainwater cannot get into the sewer line – as this is your money down the drain!
  • Check to see that outdoor patio, deck or yard drains are not connected to the sewer.
  • Check to see that pool overflow drains are not connected to the sewer.
  • Avoid planting trees and shrubs over or near sewer laterals. Roots can enter and damage sewers.

GULF BOULEVARD BEAUTIFICATION

The Town has been working actively with the Towns of Redington Beach and North Redington Beach to plan our part of the Gulf Blvd. Beautification Project.  We are working with the engineering firm of Cribb Philbeck Weaver Group, and are still in the planning stages.  Although the project is still a couple years away from becoming a reality, it will include undergrounding the cross wires from the east side of Gulf Blvd to the west, improvements to the island medians, new bus shelters, and more.  When finished our stretch of Gulf Blvd. will invite even more visitors and residents to enjoy our wonderful town.

Steve Andrews, Building Official

Why Code Enforcement?

Many town codes require town employees to enforce the specific letter of the law. Ordinances such as un-permitted landscape, over growth, trailer parking, business licensing, noise, dog/cat litter etc.… are all enforceable under Nuisances Chapter 103 and thru Code Enforcement Chapter 70 of Town Code.

Who’s responsible?

The Town Codes above, and Chapter 90 Land Development Regulations, say that you, as property owners are responsible.

As residents, association board members, operators, and managers you are responsible for any violations on your property, even if committed by tenants.

Clerk’s Corner

The Municipal Election has been set for March 14th 2017 for District Two and District Four.  Qualifying will start 9:00 a.m. on December 2nd, 2016 and closing at 12-noon on December 16th  2016.

The Town is again planning for our July 4th Celebration.  Donations towards this favorite town event are now being collected.  If you would like to donate, please stop by town hall with your donation.

We hope you have enjoyed the town’s newly designed web site.  We have added so much more information and the site is now mobile friendly!  Thank you Commissioner Henderson and staff for all your work involved.

CONSTANT CONTACT

If you wish to be included in Town’s “Constant Contact” email messages, please click here or provide your email address to town hall at info@townofredingtonshores.com, or stop by town hall to sign up.

Important Phone Numbers

  • Household/Chemical disposal (727) 464-7500
  • Watering Restrictions (800) 848-0499
  • Mosquito Problems (727) 464-7503
  • Water/Reclaim Emergencies (727) 464-4000
  • After Hours Lift Station Alarm (727) 595-5414
  • Town Sprinkler Issue (727) 595-5414
  • Pinellas County Animal Services (727) 582-2600

TOWN OF REDINGTON SHORES  NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM – (NPDES)

POINTLESS PERSONAL POLLUTION  

WHEREVER YOU LIVE, YOUR DAILY ACTIVITIES COULD END UP POLLUTING FLORIDA

WATER:

Pollutants from our homes, businesses and farms are major contributors to the pollution of Florida’s surface and ground waters. This pollution is washed into the state’s waters by rain or irrigation water and is known as POINTLESS PERSONAL POLLUTION. Unlike many other types of pollution, WE cause this pollution and WE can stop it!

WHAT IS POINTLESS PERSONAL POLLUTION?

The blame for water pollution often is aimed at “point sources,” such as industrial or sewage treatment facilities. Discharges from these sources flow through pipes and can be readily identified and treated. But Pointless Personal Pollution is difficult to identify and treat. This is because many of our daily activities can cause this pollution and it can travel by many different routes into the ground and surface waters. Take a look around your home and property. You can find many sources of Pointless Personal Pollution that could end up in the state’s waters. Some examples of these pollutants are:

  1. Sediments from soil erosion caused by unvegetated soils and by uncontrolled construction activities.
  2. Automotive and lawn equipment oil and grease leaking on paved areas or improper disposal of used oil and other products into storm drains.
  3. Runoff of pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers from lawns, gardens, farms and golf courses.
  4. Organic contaminants from litter, yard trash, sludge, garbage from dumpsters and garbage cans and pet and livestock wastes.
  5. Pathogens and excessive nutrients from sewer leaks and septic tanks overflowing or located in areas with high water tables.

HOW DOES POINTLESS PERSONAL POLLUTION IMPACT OUR WATERS?

Pointless Personal Pollution contains many kinds of pollutants which contaminate our waters in many ways, such as:

A) Nutrients from fertilizers, septic tanks and animal wastes enter our waters causing excessive growth of algae and aquatic weeds.
B) Heavy metals and pesticides that can kill aquatic organisms and contaminate sediments.
C) Sewage, garbage and litter reduce oxygen in the water to levels that can kill aquatic life.
D) Sediments from soil erosion clog fish gills and shellfish filter systems cutting off their oxygen supply.
E) Pathogens from septic tanks and animal wastes contaminate shellfish and lead to the closing of swimming areas.

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE POINTLESS PERSONAL POLLUTION?  

HOME & HOUSEHOLD MAINTENANCE

  • SHOP WISELY. Buy products labeled biodegradable, non-toxic, non-phosphorus, or water soluble.   WHY…they readily decompose and will not pollute surface or ground water.
  • STORE PRODUCTS SAFELY.
    Keep toxic products in original containers, closed and clearly marked in safe storage places. WHY…to prevent spillage or accidents to children or pets.
  • PROPERLY MAINTAIN SEPTIC SYSTEM.
    Inspect systems annually and pump out as needed. Avoid caustic cleaners, chemicals or solvents. WHY…they might destroy waste reducing bacteria or clog absorption fields, which could cause runoff of inadequately, treated wastes during rainstorms.

LAWN AND GARDEN  

  • USE GARDEN AND LAWN CHEMICALS WISELY.
    Follow package directions carefully and only use pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers when other methods fail. Do not apply if rain is in the forecast. WHY…excessive fertilizers and chemicals wash off the property and into surface and ground waters.
  • KEEP IRRIGATION WATER ON THE LAWN AND GARDEN (NOT ON PAVED SURFACES).
    Divert rainspouts onto unpaved areas or swales and wash vehicles on vegetated areas. WHY…this allows runoff to soak into the soil and not wash over paved surfaces into nearby water bodies.
  • COMPOST LEAVES, GRASS AND SCRUB CLIPPINGS.
    Use as mulch for fertilizer and do not rake into roadways. WHY…these materials will decompose and return nutrients to the soil and avoid the necessity of applying fertilizers.

AUTOMOTIVE

  • DON’T DRAIN USED MOTOR OIL INTO STORM DRAINS.
    Take used motor oil and antifreeze to service stations to recycle them. WHY…these products are toxic and add pollutants to surface waters if placed or washed into storm drains.
  • SERVICE YOUR CAR REGULARLY.
    Have your car inspected and maintained regularly. WHY…to prevent leakage of motor oil, antifreeze and other fluids which can end up in the nearest waterbody. Well-maintained vehicles reduce air emissions, which can contaminate surface waters.

Town’s Responsibility: As a co-permittee of the NPDES program the Town participates with other neighboring cities in the Gulf Beaches Household Chemical Collection Day. The Town keeps the residents informed of this activity thru our Town access channel (Channel 642) and through literature placed in the Town library. All residents may call the Town Hall with any concerns of illicit discharge into the storm drains. Town staff will respond to these calls and take appropriate action.

IF YOU WANT TO BE PART OF THE SOLUTION AND WANT MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT THE FOLLOWING: 

More info from Pinellas County: NPDES Stormwater Quality

Pinellas: Affordable Care Act open enrollment starts today

Navigators ready to help residents with ACA enrollment with events throughout the county

  • Open enrollment starts today and runs through Jan. 31.
  • Enrollment events scheduled throughout the county.
  • Appointments can be made online at www.pinellascounty.org/navigators.

The Affordable Care Act open enrollment starts today and runs through Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. Health care Navigators will be stationed throughout Pinellas County to guide residents through their Affordable Care Act insurance plan selections.

Navigators can answer residents’ health insurance questions and provide information about enrolling in a plan through the online Healthcare Marketplace. Through the Affordable Care Act, those who do not have health insurance, are under-insured or are not old enough for Medicare may enroll in an insurance plan that will match their household’s budget and family’s needs.

To ensure effective and efficient delivery of county services and support, multiple events are planned every month during the enrollment period. Pinellas County is partnering with libraries, neighborhood family centers, Pinellas County Schools, Pinellas Technical College and local churches to host these events.

On a day-to-day basis, Navigators are stationed across the county to provide easy acess to assistance. Residents can make an appointment with a Navigator to:

  • explore options, plan prices and benefits available through the Affordable Care Act
  • obtain assistance in determining eligibility on sliding-scale subsidies and tax credits
  • review any free or low-cost programs for which they may qualify
  • receive referrals to alternative medical care
  • obtain enrollment assistance to find a health care package best suited to their needs

For a full schedule of events and to make an appointment with a Navigator, call (727) 464-8411 or visit www.pinellascounty.org/navigators. The project described is supported by Funding Opportunity Number CA-NAV-15-001 from the U.S Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The contents provided are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of HHS or any of its agencies.